How to Love the Job You’ve Got

Written by Claire Colvin

career-love-jobEvery day we hear about people making radical career changes. The opportunities exist, but will all these changes make us any happier once we get there? Maybe the question is not “how can I get the job I’ll love?”, but “how can I love the job I have?” Following are four practical steps towards coming to terms with why you do what you’re doing. Take some time to think about it, and you might be surprised by what you find.

  1. Realize that your job does not define you, but how you do it does. There’s a lot to be said for attitude, more than will fit here. Any job can be done well, done with compassion, done with care. Your attitude at work and the way you treat people — even your mood — does not go unnoticed. They have a profound influence on the people you work with. There are times when you can’t control your situation, but you can always choose how you live in it.
  2. Stop focusing on the money. Money will never be enough so stop using it (or the lack of it) as an excuse. Whatever you are bringing home on the 15th and 30th, there are always going to be things you could do or would do if you had more. Try taking tracking every penny you spend in a week. Seeing where your money is really going can help you to refocus your spending towards the things you really want. Getting paid is only one small part of what you do, your work has to be more than just a paycheck to be fulfilling.
  3. Find the significance in what you do. This may require you to think big, but it can be done. Take some time to really think about what you do. Do you provide an essential service? Do you get to see the finished product? Do you give direction that gets things done? Then ask yourself “how is this job done differently because I am doing it?” Perspective plays a huge role in personal satisfaction and sense of well being. Try to remember why you took the job in the first place. If it was only going to be “for now” are you actively looking for other work?
  4. Dare to ask yourself if it’s worth it. If you can’t find the part of your job that you like, or if you can see yourself turning into the person you said you would never be, consider the reasons. It may not be a new job that you need, just a new direction. Do you like the person you are doing this job? If not, are there changes you can make to the way you do your job or is the job itself the problem? Do you need to be doing a different position within the same company? Are additional responsibilities taking you away from the work you were hired to do? Maybe all that’s needed is some refocusing. Learn to say “no”. As much as you can choose the things you spend your time on, don’t attend events or meetings only because everyone expects it.

Asking yourself why you do your job doesn’t mean you’re dissatisfied, just self-aware. This awareness can lead to greater job satisfaction, increased sense of well being and a little more control over what you do, rather than just “going along for the ride.” For some, it may be time for a change – if so, don’t be afraid of it. Change isn’t necessarily bad, it’s just different. For the rest of us, take a look around, you may find you’ve got a great view.

Related reading:
From Making Money to Giving it Away – Bobby Dobson seemed destined for business success. Sure enough, he eventually rose to the top of his game as a tax lawyer. But Bobby’s achievements came at a price …
The Door-to-Door Salesman – How Doug Hesse, founder of Hesse Financial Advisors, had his life changed when one of his customers explained to him what he was selling!

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14 Responses to “How to Love the Job You’ve Got”

  • Aldo says:

    Lola, I am happy that this article has helped you. So many people today view their jobs as little less than everyday drudgery, when, in fact, it should be an intricate part of life, interacting with others to build relationships which will enrich them.

    It’s been said that “If you enjoy your job, you never have to work a day in your life.” What a unique concept.

    Lola, if you would like to chat with a mentor on a one to one basis, click on Talk to a mentor above. She will be happy to discuss any issues you may have, or just to pray with you.

  • Lola says:

    I needed to read this, It made an instant change in how I view this job now.

  • Sharon says:

    good article thank you for posting this

  • Kunde Gabriel says:

    A nice piece. I feel different now about my job

  • hawaa says:

    I like it. Fantastic idea

  • samatha Parkey says:

    Feeling so motivated after reading this post. Claire, You’ve nicely addressed the problems one feels in this certain stage. I have also gone through a great resource about “22 Kickass Ways to Love Your Job – Even if You Hate It” at http://rewardsandreocgnition.wordpress.com/2013/09/13/22-kickass-ways-to-love-your-job-even-if-you-hate-it/

    Hope this will also prove useful to the readers here.

  • […] I could go on, but the bottom line is…contentment is what brings us to this place. Contentment reminds me that I don’t need a bigger house, a nicer car, more clothes, or a ‘more important’ career. […]

  • Maya says:

    Hi Claire,

    Thank you for the insightful article! Not focusing on the money is so important. Also, I couldn’t agree more that changing how you do your job, or taking on different tasks within the same job can go a long way. We have a very basic need for change, and, as you say, making changes within your current job may be all that’s needed! I recently wrote an article that elaborate on this: http://www.greatlivingnow.com/2012/05/01/loving-your-job-for-life/
    I hope you find it insightful. – Maya

  • Jamie Jamie says:

    I am sure Mr Fogel appreciates your unabashed plug for his book Tyler. Are you on commission? :)

    You’re right, I love knowing that my work has significance. I can handle all kinds of menial tasks when I know that it is accomplishing something important.

    What are some of the things that you have found helpful in “Reboot Your Career”?

  • Tyler says:

    Good advice. I think focusing on the significance of work is really helpful, as it gives real perspective to the menial tasks.
    I think taking action to improve your situation helps as well. I’m reading “Reboot Your Career” by Peter Fogel, and it’s really inspiring me to take charge and reinvent myself in the workplace. It’s an empowering feeling!

  • Doris Beck Doris says:

    What a great ideas for changing our perspective! I agree Debra…it is fantastic!

  • DEBRA says:

    Fantastic!

  • thanks for the post, i hope to love my job as to get motivated also..

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